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What to See & Do

What to See & Do

Overview of What to See & Do – Please see specific categories for additional opportunities.

Find the Artist Within You

ALDER HOUSE III GLASSBLOWING STUDIO

611 Immonen Road • www.alderhouse.comhotglass@alderhouse.com
When you visit Alder House III, you will be standing in Oregon’s oldest glassblowing studio. The original facility opened 38 years ago, and the current facility, tucked in a romantic wooded area, opened March 15, 1999. Alder House is open daily at 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., from March 15 to the end of November. At Alder House you can watch the artists blow glass art pieces or purchase pieces previously created. The artists are happy to share information about their art. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged. Located about 1 mile up Immonen Road just a half-mile south of the Siletz Bay Bridge on the south end of Lincoln City, Alder House III can be reached from anywhere in Lincoln City within 15 or 20 minutes. Admission is free, and a motor coach turn around exists just a short distance up Immonen Road. Groups of 25 or fewer can be accommodated comfortably or larger groups in shifts. Public restrooms are available. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes.

JENNIFER L. SEARS GLASS ART STUDIO

SW 48th and Hwy 101 • 541-996-2569 • www.oregoncoast.orgwww.jennifersearsglassart.com
At this glassblowing studio you will have the opportunity not only to see glassblowing in progress, but also to do it. The studio opened in February 2005 and offers glassblowing demonstrations free to the public, Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., exclusive of a few major holidays. For a modest fee, the artists at the studio will also teach you how to blow your own glass float or make your own paperweight or sea creature. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged, and the artists make every effort to educate guests about the various techniques of glass art. Retail sales of glass art are available across the street at Volta. Public restrooms and visitor information about the area are available, and a deli across the parking lot at the IGA makes an inexpensive lunch readily available. It is best to call ahead for reservations. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes.

JUST THE HIGHLIGHTS

TAKE A WALK ON THE BEACH

—anywhere.
There are more than 17 public beach accesses in Lincoln City. Most areas would be drop off points for a full motor coach. Parking is limited, and only a few have public restrooms. A map depicting those is available in the downloadable Activity Guide. Recommended time: Not less than an hour.

SHOP AT TANGER OUTLET STORES

1500 SE East Devils Lake Road • 866-665-8680 • www.tangeroutlet.com
Tanger Outlet has more than 50 brand name discount stores offer tax free shopping. It is located about 10 blocks south of the D-River State Wayside. Public restrooms; motor coach parking; handicap accessibility; food. Recommended time: at least an hour.

CHINOOK WINDS CASINO RESORT

1777 NW 44th • 888-CHINOOK • www.chinookwindscasino.com
The casino is owned and operated by the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and is open 24/7. Chinook Winds has slot machines, keno, black jack, poker, live entertainment, children’s arcade, and more. Restrooms, handicap accessibility, motor coach parking, and food. There’s no admission fee for anything other than the live entertainment, but…Recommended time: at least an hour.

JENNIFER L. SEARS GLASS ART STUDIO

SW 48th and Hwy 101 • 541-996-2569 • www.jennifersearsglassart.com
At this glassblowing studio you will have the opportunity not only to see glassblowing in progress, but also to do it. The studio opened in February 2005 and offers glassblowing demonstrations free to the public, Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., exclusive of a few major holidays. For a modest fee, the artists at the studio will also teach you how to blow your own glass float or make your own paperweight or sea creature. Photography and questions are allowed and encouraged, and the artists make every effort to educate guests about the various techniques of glass art. Retail sales of glass art are available across the street at Volta. Public restrooms and visitor information about the area are available, and a deli across the parking lot at the IGA makes an inexpensive lunch readily available. It is best to call ahead for reservations. Recommended time allotment for your stay is 45-60 minutes.

MO’S RESTAURANT

860 SW 51st • 541-996-2535 • www.moschowder.com
If you stop for lunch or dinner at Mo’s, a traditional coastal favorite, you get the benefit of a great view of beautiful Siletz Bay, its wildlife, and maybe even that phantom ghost ship. Public restrooms, wheelchair accessibility, food, motor coach parking available nearby.

Quiet Communing With Nature

CONNIE HANSEN GARDEN

1831 NW 33rd • 541-994-6338 • www.conniehansengarden.com
One place not to miss is the Connie Hansen Garden located on NW 33rd. This 1 1/3 acre horticultural wonder was created by University of California botanist Connie Hansen during the last two decades of her life. Since her death, a cadre of garden angels have continued voluntarily to develop it further and keep it open free of charge to the public.

In the spring, more than 300 rhododendrons and azaleas set the show ablaze. But the garden is so well planned that something is in bloom at all times of the year. You can stroll down the grassy paths to view wonders just two inches tall or towering thirty feet above.

Guided tours are available by advance reservation. Public restroom and some handicap availability. Motor Coach drop off and pickup at the parking lot entrance is possible. Admission free but donations greatly appreciated.

REGATTA PARK

Regatta Park, which fronts Devils Lake on NE 14th, boasts a state-of-the-art playground for the children, as well as a boat launch, walking trails, and an Interpretive Center. This site represents the closest, most easily accessible example of mature forest in the Lincoln City area. One 400-year-old tree is more than 200 feet tall and 35 feet around at its base. The nature trail is moderately difficult. Regatta Park is a great place for a picnic. Admission to the park is free. Public restrooms, motor coach parking, handicap accessible, picnic tables.

SPRING LAKE TRAIL

The trail, just a few hundred feet from Regatta Park, is approximately 2.5 miles long through a wooded area surrounding beautiful Spring Lake. The terrain is considered moderately difficult, although much of the trail is paved, creating handicap accessibility. The parking lot for this area is just north of east 14th on Port. Admission is free.

SILETZ BAY INTERPRETIVE KIOSK

Just south of SW 51st on the ocean side of the highway is the Siletz Bay Park, with interpretive kiosk and picnic tables. The area offers a stunning view of Siletz Bay and its variety of bird species and other wildlife. The interpretive kiosk provides information about the wildlife in the Bay and the history of the Bay. It is admission free, handicap accessible, and has restrooms.

DISCOVER YOUR CULINARY SIDE

THE CULINARY CENTER IN LINCOLN CITY

801 SW Hwy 101, 4th floor North • 800-452-2151 • www.oregoncoast.org
The Culinary Center focuses on the abundant foods and culinary heritage of the Pacific Northwest. Good, safe and wholesome foods locally grown, seasonally fresh and whole (or minimally processed) are not only more pleasurable to eat and prepare, but also minimize the negative impact on the environment. The Center is committed to teaching time-tested methods and skills, with special attention to strengthening the connections between farmers, fishermen, and other producers and the consumer.

The program includes cooking classes and demonstrations for individuals and groups with respect to all kinds of cuisine, not just Pacific Northwest. It includes a variety of invited chefs from other states, regions and countries to deepen the value of the program.

Call Chef Sharon Wiest at 800-452-2151 or check our website to see what classes are offered during your stay in Lincoln City. Planning for a group, corporate party, tour, wedding or family reunion? We can arrange a class just for you!

CRABBING ON THE BAY ON SW 51ST

Crabbing and clamming are great ocean activities for any group, any time of the year. Siletz Bay and Siletz River at the south edge of Lincoln City are prime spots for crabbing. The best time of day is an hour or two before or after low tide when the creatures are active and water currents disturb the crab gear least. All you need is a crab ring net, bait, license, and a measuring gauge, all of which can be obtained from Eleanor’s Undertow or Tiki’s, both on SW 51st. The regulations for crabbing are posted on the Taft Dock on SW 51st, next to Mo’s.

CLAMMING ANYWHERE ON THE BEACH OR IN THE BAY

Clamming is as simple as crabbing and equally satisfying. Most of the clams found in this area are either the smaller butter clams or larger razor clams. Look for dimples or holes in the sand, then place your shovel a few inches farther than the hole, in the direction of the ocean, and pull back, scooping the sand away to expose the clam, or wait until low tide and find pockets near rocky outcroppings. Those pockets frequently contain a number of clams. Each person is allowed to harvest 20 butter clams and 15 razor clams per day, and a license is required. It is advisable to check with local authorities to determine if red tide conditions exist that make harvesting unwise.

Both of these activities can be enjoyed before or after your culinary lesson. The most important thing is making certain your group has accommodations with a kitchen so you can enjoy your catch as you try out your newly acquired skills. www.clamdigging.info

WILDLIFE VIEWING

HARBOR SEALS, BROWN PELICANS, GULLS, SANDERLINGS, AND EAGLES

Siletz Bay • SW 51st

As many as 150 harbor seals frequently can be seen sunning themselves on the Salishan spit in Siletz Bay on SW 51st. These mammals, reaching six feet in length and 250 pounds, dive as deeply as 60 feet and stay under water an average of five minutes. If you see their pups lying on the beach, leave them alone. Their mothers frequently leave them for hours, even overnight, while hunting for food. If you touch the pups, the mothers will not return to them, and they will likely die.

Brown pelicans are one of six endangered species inhabiting the area from late spring through early fall. They are noticeable for their rag-tag formations and habit of folding their wings and collapsing into the water to catch prey.

Adorable flocks of sanderlings and sandpipers race along the beach, just ahead or behind the tide line, to catch their crustacean dinners, while large groups of seagulls swoop in to steal their meals from beached fish or even unsuspecting humans with lunch. The brown colored gulls are juveniles, not a different kind.

Restaurants, wheelchair access, motor coach parking and food are all readily available in the area.

DEVILS LAKE

On the northeast side of Lincoln City, 680-acre (hectares) Devils Lake has easy access and abundant parking. The lake and forests should reveal at least 2 dozen species with more possible depending on the time of year and your luck.

Devils Lake is also home to several thousand Chinese grass carp, many the size of miniature poodles. Schools of grass carp are easily seen at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road. The only expense you might incur watching wildlife on Devils Lake is the rent for your party to take a pontoon ride or kayak trip on the lake. These are available at Blue Heron Landing.

WHALES

Of course the largest mammals around are the whales. The grays are the most commonly seen, though pods of orcas also travel through on occasion. Gray whales were removed from the endangered species list in 1994 and are best seen during their migration period from mid-November through mid-May. To view them easily, travel to an elevated place like Cascade Head, SW 40th Street, Roads End, or an upper floor of an oceanfront motel. 200 of them live in the area year-round and are spotted almost daily.

If you wish to take an ocean whale-watching voyage, there are several charter boat companies in Depoe Bay, just eight miles south of Lincoln City, which can take you on an hour-long trip for a nominal fee. Total time round trip from Lincoln City is less than two hours.

OTTERS & BIRDS

Lincoln City has two important bird areas recognized by the National Audubon Society. Although Pacific sea otters were hunted to extinction here early in the last century, freshwater otters, reaching nearly three feet in length, still cavort in inlets and streams.  Some are even occasionally seen on Devils Lake.  Devils Lake also boasts colorful perching wood ducks, coots, loons, and, of course, the Great Blue Heron.  The stately bird, which may be found also in Siletz Bay, is approximately four feet (1.22 m) tall at maturity.  If you are lucky, you might even catch a glimpse of its elaborate and graceful mating dance.

ROOSEVELT ELK

Highway 101 at the north end of Lincoln City.

Perhaps the largest mammal in the area, other than whales, is the Roosevelt Elk, reaching one thousand pounds. They travel in large herds in the meadows around the Salmon River Estuary and Chinook Winds Casino Golf Resort, going down to the edge of Devils Lake for water. The elk are most visible during the winter months. In order to find food and water, elk and deer often need to cross Highway 101, so be alert and cautious when driving.

NORTH LINCOLN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM

For those who love history or just “old stuff”, the North Lincoln County Historical Museum is a real treat. The downstairs exhibit gallery includes displays on Native American history with examples of baskets and beadwork; early settlement and homesteading tools and household items; and artifacts from dairies, fishing outfits, and canneries. Roadside attractions, early tourism promotions like the notorious “Redhead Roundup”, and one-of-a-kind businesses like the Pixie Kitchen are also exhibited. A hands-on children’s corner will keep younger children entertained while their parents tour the museum. The museum is located in the historic Taft district of Lincoln City at 4907 SW Highway 101. Hours are noon to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, closed in January. Public restrooms. Donations welcomed. Wheelchair access. Motor coach parking on the street.

DRIFT CREEK COVERED BRIDGE

Covered bridges have always been of historic and photographic interest in Oregon. One of Oregon’s oldest, the Drift Creek Covered Bridge was originally constructed in 1914 on Drift Creek just south and east of Lincoln City, Oregon. Laura and Kerry Sweitz saved it from destruction in 2001.

The Sweitzes gave the bridge and the land upon which it rests to Lincoln County and embraced with open arms the opportunity to share it with visitors 365 days a year. It now stands as a memorial to its pioneer builders, from both this century and last, and a unique and serene place for visitors to enjoy.

For all they have given, the Sweitzes, who live only a few yards from the bridge, ask in return only that visitors respect their privacy and their need for quiet. To get there, travel east of Lincoln City, OR, on Highway 18. Approximately 3.5 miles east of the Otis Café turn south on North Bear Creek Road. Proceed about one mile. The Bridge is on the left. Otherwise, enjoy it for a picnic, a photo expedition, or just for its simple wonder and the tale it tells of generosity and the human spirit.

Restrooms, picnic area, handicap accessibility small coach parking. Allow at least two hours to travel and enjoy this bridge. Don’t forget your camera. Admission is free.

SILETZ BAY INTERPRETIVE KIOSK

Just south of SW 51st on the ocean side of the highway is the Siletz Bay Park, with interpretive kiosk and picnic tables. The area offers a stunning view of Siletz Bay and its variety of bird species and other wildlife. The interpretive kiosk provides information about the wildlife in the Bay and the history of the Bay. It is admission free, handicap accessible, and has restrooms. The parking lot is small and would not be appropriate for a full motor coach, although smaller shuttle transportation could be accommodated. Allow 30 minutes to an hour.

ANTIQUING

For more than a decade Lincoln City has been the place to go on the Coast if you are interested in antiques and collectibles. With more than 30 separate stores and over 80 dealers, Lincoln City usually has that specialty item for which you have long been searching.

To celebrate the quality of “antiquing” every February Lincoln City hosts Antique Week, a ten-day long event. Antique Week features city-wide antique store sales at which you can save as much as 25% on your purchases. In addition, although each Antique Week is a bit different from the others, it generally offers city-wide sales, exhibits, and an appraise-a-thon fair.

For a map and list of Lincoln City’s antique stores, contact the Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau at 800-452-2151. This tour is free until you find that item you just can’t live without.

JUST ADD WATER

SURF’S UP

Lincoln City has ten miles of steady waves from Roads End at the north to Salishan at the south. Those swells encounter rocky reefs offshore, piling the water into mammoth waves just waiting for the rider. A popular spot is Roads End State Park. And if you need equipment or instruction, help is a short distance away at the Oregon Surf Shop, the Lincoln City Surf Shop, or Safari Town Surf Shop. In the winter months, the Nelscott area is known for its “Hawaii-like” swells intended only for the experts. Motor coach access and restrooms available only at Roads End State Park. Recommended time: as long as the surf’s up.

LAKE SPORTS

The 680-acre(hectares) lake is a popular spot for water skiers and jet skiers, particularly from Memorial Day through September when the weather is calmer and the lake is warmer. Other water activities include bumper boats, hydrobikes, swimming, a pontoon, motorboats, kayaks and canoes, all of which can be rented at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road, 541-994-4708.

RIVER SPORTS

The Salmon River to the north, Siletz Bay and the Siletz River to the south provide quieter water activities. On those waters you can take a swim or enjoy a peaceful kayak or canoe trip. Kayaks for the rivers and Bay may be rented from the Oregon Surf Shop, 541-996-3957.

Motor coach parking, restrooms, and food are available at Siletz Bay and Devils Lake. Recommended time for any of these activities is not less than two hours.

ESPECIALLY FOR KIDS

REGATTA PARK

NE 14th Street and West Devils Lake Road
Regatta Park, which fronts Devils Lake on NE 14th boasts a state-of-the-art playground for the children, as well as a boat launch, walking trails, and an Interpretive Center. This site represents the closest, most easily accessible example of mature forest in the Lincoln City area. One 400-year-old tree is more than 200 feet tall and 35 feet around at its base. The nature trail is moderately difficult and starts at the north end of the park. Whether or not you elect to walk the trail, the beauty of this area and its voluminous bird life can easily be enjoyed from the picnic tables. Regatta Park is a great place for a picnic. Admission to the park is free. Public restrooms, motor coach parking, handicap accessible, picnic tables.

ON THE BEACH

Tide pooling at Roads End or NW 40th, combing the beach for agates and shells, hunting for glass floats, especially from mid-October through Memorial Day each year.

DEVILS LAKE

Northeast side of Lincoln City of Lincoln City
The 680-acre(hectares) lake is a popular spot for water skiers and jet skiers, particularly from Memorial Day through September when the weather is calmer and the lake is warmer. Other water activities include bumper boats, hydrobikes, swimming, fishing, a pontoon, motorboats, kayaks and canoes, all of which can be rented at Blue Heron Landing, 4006 W. Devils Lake Road, 541-994-4708.

MOVIES

For those who want to sit quietly and be entertained, there is always a good movie showing at the Bijou Theatre in the Oceanlake District or Lincoln City Cinemas Six on South Hwy 101.

MINIATURE GOLF

For the more energetic group that needs a bit of wearing out before bed, several locations offer a variety of activities. All American Putt-N-Bat at 1255 NW Highway 101 has miniature golf, video games and slow- and fast-pitch batting cages. At Neil’s Pizza and Pool Hall at 1512 SE Highway 101, you can grab a bite for dinner and watch your 12-year-old bring you to your knees in defeat behind a pool cue. And if that does not destroy your confidence enough, let that 12-year-old take you on for a line or two at Delake Bowl just south of the D-River Wayside. Or you can always take the kids to swim at the Community Center pool, east of Highway 101 and just south of NW 22nd.

ARCADES

1.    CHINOOK WINDS CASINO RESORT
 1777 NW 44TH • 888-CHINOOK • www.chinookwindsgaming.com 
Chinook Winds has a variety of arcade games to choose from and monitored childcare to protect your child while you all take a break.
2.    ELEANOR’S UNDERTOW 
869 SW 51st • 541-996-3800 
Eleanor’s, famous for ice cream and hotdogs, has a kids game room and a great view of Siletz Bay.

SKATEBOARDING

Lincoln City has a spectacular skateboard park named one of the “gnarliest” parks in the United States. The 8,000 square foot facility in Kirtsis Park has more than 100 lines and a unique 9-foot bowl to challenge boarders of all levels. A second park, only a short distance from the first, is covered to facilitate boarding in inclement weather. The new park, the Cradle, is 8600 square feet with 5600 square feet under a roof.